'Does my lounge look big in this [double-height space]' you'll ask your partner, but for once you hope they reply, 'kinda, yeah'... Because, as the first lady of Cameroon will attest, the more volume, the better.

As a way to let in more light, create a connection between two levels or even to give the illusion of extra space, a double-height volume can do wonders for your home. Here are five homes that give great double-height...

Paddington Residence

At Paddington Residence by Ellivo Architects, a stunning double-height dining volume is created as the hub of the house, a central meeting point for everyone in the home. The parents' retreat overlooks this space, feeling both connected and separate to the rest of the home. Creating a bookshelf for the balustrade (stop it!), accessible by a sliding ladder like you would find in your library of dreams makes this double-height space even more of a charmer.

Slide your ladder over and take a look...

Freshwater Semi

Freshwater Semi

At a home just 3.6 metres wide, a double-height space becomes a clever strategy to create the illusion of additional space. The double-height space also sneaks in extra light from some north-facing clerestory windows.

Is it really only 3.6 metres wide?

Bow House by Edwards Moore Architects (via Lunchbox Architect)

Bow House by Edwards Moore Architects (via Lunchbox Architect)

This Bow-shaped home really goes out of its way to bring in the sunlight, twisting and contorting to maximise its owners' vitamin-D levels. One benefit of all these acrobatics is a double-height volume above the living area, which acts as a little fanfare trumpet heralding your arrival in the backyard.

Celebrate your arrival in the backyard and take a look around

Playtime

Playtime

A double-height space takes this Californian bungalow from dark to fabs, by opening the hallway to the backyard and creating a functional space around the staircase. Upstairs the children can cross a bridge over the double-height space between their bedrooms. It's a place of fun upstairs, where imaginations are free-range.

There's more fun to be had by reading the article

Mountford Road living area

Mountford Road living area

Terrified of pressure cookers? Yeah, me too, but there's nothing to be afraid of at this home where a double-height space is used as a pressure release, providing a dramatic contrast to the existing low ceiling heights.

Slowly release the lid on this beautiful home

Hoddle House Sliding Glass Doors, Rugs, Planters, Clerestory Windows

Hoddle House Outdoor Areas, Timber Floors, Timber Deck, Pendant Lighting, Curtains, Dining Areas, Lunchbox Architect on Instagram

A bonus project because I can't (won't?) count. Also, this project is a favourite on Pinterest (which you should follow me on, please) so it's got to be doing something right.

Here the additional volume is created by a raked ceiling, so while it's not technically a double-height space, it creates dramatic sensation and makes the home feel larger than it really is. The use of clerestory windows also lets in light, making the home feel lighter and brighter too.

More of those raked ceilings, ploise